Destination: Toronto, Ontario

In just under three hours we drove from Grand Bend to Toronto and I have to say Google maps was spot on with the timing. We had chosen to drive back on the Civic holiday and almost everyone who we spoke with from Toronto said we were in for a long journey back; at least 4-5 hours so I guess we were lucky.

We were meeting a longtime friend in Toronto and her boys for a week in the controversially named neighbourhood of “The beaches” or “The Beach” east side of the city where she grew up and still resides. It was mid-afternoon and she greeted us in her usual style over a cool, crisp glass of white wine. I believe it was a gewürztraminer  and the first time I tasted a gewurz was four years ago with her in the Niagara on the lake area vineyards.

I finally introduced my son to her sons and it was a wonderful feeling to see them unite. The boys were still on holidays so it worked out perfectly. We enjoyed some beach fun,  another beautiful freshwater lake beach. Pictured is a lifeguard from Woodbine Beach on Lake Ontario.

My friend’s local cafe ‘Lazy Daisy’s’ www.lazydaisyscafe.ca located at 1515 Gerrard Street, Toronto, Ontario, became our local favourite over the course of the week. Each morning we ordered a delicious coffee which is a challenge to find anywhere in Canada, but they do exist! This homely place which has been described in reviews as ‘farmhouse chic’ reminiscent of her childhood days on her family’s farm. The menu provides a large selection of healthy options using fresh local produce and sweet treats that tasted more wholesome than naughty too.  We loved the blueberry cornmeal muffin, cooked beautifully and the right size for the three of us to share a couple of bites with our coffee. We must have worked our way through a good proportion of the sandwich menu with favourites like the Coronation Chicken, Veggie Patch wrap and Farmer’s Club with mouth-watering Egli’s smoked bacon and garlic aioli which would please most I suspect.

The owner has catered to kids with books, a train table, comfy seats and colouring in sheets with a wall of fame for the youngsters (if they are worthy) to put their finished art up on.

As my world revolves around delicious food much of the time, a trip to St Lawrence food markets –www.stlawrencemarket.com was in order. It is somewhat an escape from the hustle and bustle of downtown Toronto with like-minded people gazing at the endless treasure trove…a foodie’s heaven.

The number of food markets I have visited on my travels has really clocked up over the years. I would have to say that this one was serendipitous.

There were so many specialty ingredients and produce items you could source in the realms of this grand building. The selection of smoked meats, cheeses from around the world, seafood, wines, produce, ice-wines, truffled products, rainbow coloured pasta, tomahawk steaks from Alberta, baked goods galore was mind-blowing. It hardly does it justice, but I guarantee it is a must do, must see for yourself experience! After wearing ourselves out in the market, my friend took us to a restaurant she knew well from trips with her parents as a child. An institution which has been running for over a quarter of a century; Paddington’s Pump – St Lawrence Market, 93 Front Street E, Toronto sure packs a punch with its ‘Oink on a Kaiser’. It is the most bacon I have ever seen on a bun!

Ok, so moving on…I must note that the days have passed where I used to spend hours shopping in gorgeous boutiques and finishing with a good wine while taking great pleasure in my purchases. I am lucky these days if I can enjoy one or two stores at a time with a little boy in tow, but a girl can fantasize right?

A streetcar ride up Queen Street and I had to ask my girlfriend what area we were in at some point; she said ‘Queen West’, only one of Toronto’s coolest neighbourhoods and shopping districts. I so wanted to jump off right there and then and while away the hours with all my favourite things; fashion, art-design, patisserie and wine.

Before I could think about it a moment longer we were somewhere else, however this is moving to the top of my list next time I visit Toronto.

An area we spent time in together was a good compromise as I was able to step into some unique stores where there was something for everyone in Roncesvalles Village which is an area located east of High Park and north of Lake Ontario. Toronto is one of the most culturally diverse cities in the world and this part of the city is better known as the Polish community’s centre. We were funnily enough heading to lunch at Cafe Polonez – 195 Roncesvalles Ave, Toronto.

Superb! Between us, we ordered:-

Traditional Beetroot soup with dumplings (Barszcz czerwony z uszkami), which is Borscht consommé with a choice of mushroom or meat dumplings.

Pierogies (rozne nadzienia), homemade boiled dumplings served with side of sour cream and fried onions & pork; we chose the sauerkraut and mushroom, minced pork, cheddar and potato ones.

Polish Schnitzel (kotlet schabowy), plain cutlet served with potatoes and a bouquet of salads.

If I had the stomach the size of four people, I would’ve also ordered the cabbage rolls (golabki), polish sausage (kielbasa z frykami) and Goulash (gulasz wieprzowy) too!

How does the Polish proverb go? “A good appetite needs no sauce”.

My friend and her boys are so fortunate they have a wide selection of top quality Polish food on their doorstep and this is the advantage of living in a city steeped with multiple cultures and heritage.

We girls had to have a night out together to catch up. My friend booked tickets to see The Temper Trap in concert who were touring in Toronto coincidentally when we were there. They are an Australian band and had global success after releasing ‘Sweet Disposition’ which played at my wedding so it’s pretty special. The concert venue was the ‘Kool Haus’ in the Guvernment Entertainment Complex – 132 Queens Quay East, Toronto. It was a really cool space and relaxed enough for us to enjoy our vodkas and catch up over some music from home.

Dinner beforehand was a few minutes away from the venue at Against the Grain Urban Tavern – 25 Dockside Drive. When I spotted the Hendrick’s Gin that put a smile on my face and we tried the barman’s cocktail with a rosemary infused sugar syrup in it which took it to a new level for me! We ordered the fish ceviche soft tacos which were amazingly good. We were seated right on the harbour front which gave me a taste for more seafood so we both chose the Urban lobster roll with a cold glass of Niagara riesling.

I am not sure if I am saving the best till last, because the entire week was special seeing my girlfriend and her boys. However, when we were offered a date night; that is my husband and I, we jumped at the chance and booked a restaurant she recommended from a choice of a few. Given I am reading the 100 Mile Diet at present, I wanted to dine at a restaurant that focuses on locally sourced produce and more importantly we were enthusiastic to try Caribou, Elk or something that may be a rarer find on the West Coast. We dined at Globe Bistro – www.globebistro.com 124 Danforth Avenue, Toronto. To our delight, we were fortunate to enjoy the taste of Elk (a first for us) along with a duck dish, a selection of freshly shucked Malpeque (Prince Edward Island) oysters and a host of freshly picked ingredients from Ontario’s best farms on each plate. The restaurant had soft lighting with elegant chic furnishings as well as a friendly and discreet waiter who seemed to only appear with a smile whenever we needed anything leaving us to immerse ourselves in the ambient vibe.

I know my pattern of storytelling often skews towards food, but all in all the week was about seeing a very dear friend and her family at home in Toronto, meeting friends and family members.  It was a memorable time and I will miss them…until next trip of course!

“Flatiron Building” – Historic landmark of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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Destination: Guelph and Grand Bend, Ontario

I am not sure where to start. This has been the longest period between writing about our adventures and I have wanted to log in for over a week now to record it.

So I will go back to the beginning of our vacation which took off in early August flying to Toronto, Ontario. Immediately we arranged our hire car pick up and drove to Guelph, a university city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada.  It was just under an hour’s drive from Toronto Pearson International Airport. Although it was a brief stay overnight to break up our journey to Grand Bend which is approximately three hours away, we found it to be a charming town. There are many heritage buildings and distinctive limestone architecture is evident all over particularly in the downtown area of the city.

Guelph is steeped in history. With a nickname of ‘The Royal City’, according to Wikipedia; [the name Guelph comes from the Italian Guelfo and the Bavarian-Germanic Welf. It is a reference to King George IV, monarch at the time of its founding (who family was a family from the House of Hanover, a younger branch of the House of Welf) and a tongue in cheek reference to the then ascendant population in neighbouring Berlin (Kitchener). (Guelphs being the name given the northern Italian factions who opposed the reign of the Holy Roman Empire].

Guelph is the home to one of Canada’s largest breweries; Sleeman Breweries Ltd. Its headquarters were founded here in 1834. This fact is particularly important as my husband is working his way around the country trying and buying the best of what’s on offer in that department.

We booked into a bed & breakfast called the Norfolk Guest House located at 102 Eramosa Road, Guelph. It is a little pricey at the upmarket end of where B&B’s sit, however we wanted to assure maximum rest and comfort after a long flight and drive. With a glorious plush bed, double Jacuzzi tub and elegant furnishings in a large grand room we were aptly satisfied. On arrival we were greeted to a generous charcuterie and cheese plate with a bottle of red (which was pre-ordered) and we were happy. As a final unwind before hopping into bed, we enjoyed a luxury bath overflowing with bubbles, jets and soft hues of colour from lights under water. Our son found this thoroughly entertaining!

Breakfast was served in an ornate room with high ceilings and decorative fixtures. We were happy with our orders of eggs, french toast and fruit which was lovely. The only disappointment for us was the lack of warmth and hospitality from the host. My preference for bed & breakfast establishments over large chain hotels is always first and foremost for the personal service you expect. The extra touch of a friendly more intimate stay where you are introduced on a first name basis, learn more about where you are staying and the history of the location ensures a pleasant experience overall. Sadly, this was not the case but oddly enough I couldn’t flaw anything else.

Before leaving the town, we visited the Guelph Farmers’ Market located at 2 Gordon Street (corner of Gordon Street and Waterloo Avenue).  The markets are on Saturdays 7:00am to 12:00 noon (Year Round) and Wednesdays 3:00pm to 7:00pm (June 20th to October 31st only).

At 9am it was a hive of activity with locals out in full force and with over fifty vendors, these markets were plentiful; no fear in produce being scarce two hours after opening! Summer fruits were a delight, especially the peaches, watermelon and blueberries. There was a huge variety of vegetables, dairy, meat and specialty foods – we were in heaven.

By 11am it was an extremely hot 31 degrees celsius, so unfortunately we could not indulge in perishables for our long trip and there it was, we departed salivating like Pavlov’s dog.

Guelph appears to have a full calendar of events taking place and we arrived on 4 August which surprisingly was Guelph’s Annual John Galt Day (in celebration of the founder of Guelph). This was held at the City Hall & John Galt Park. While we were enjoying the sounds of the music and entertainment kicking off, we wandered over to the Cornerstone Restaurant/Cafe at 1 Wyndham Street North, Guelph.

Although we stopped in for coffee only, it has a laid back pub-like feel and serves vegetarian food. Breakfast sounded good with options like cornmeal waffles with blueberry compote and I’ve heard the African Bean Stew and the Corner Club sandwich are a reasonably good pick for lunch too. Our coffee was just how I like it, hot and not too strong.  It did the job and picked me up for a good part of the journey to Grand Bend.

We were meeting friends and their family at Grand Bend and staying with them in a cottage. Grand Bend is located on Lake Huron, one of the five Great Lakes in North America. Lake Huron has a surface area of 23,000 square miles making it the third largest fresh-water lake on Earth.

A Torontonian friend who now resides in Vancouver told us before we left that it was a ‘party town’. I laughed as I thought it couldn’t possibly be when I knew we were visiting friends with their children and families staying in a quaint holiday cottage to have some peaceful beach time. On arrival it did appear that way; quiet, relaxed and beach around the corner which was by no means packed on any occasions we were there. However, I understood what he meant when we took a drive on our way out one afternoon on Main Street and witnessed for myself that this lazy beach town which is populated with a few thousand inhabitants most of the year round, actually increases to approximately 100,000 in the summertime. Whoa was it busy!

We enjoyed a dinner out at the Growlin Gator Bar & Grill – 86 Main Street, Grand Bend, Ontario, Canada. With a pumping vibe so close to the main beach, we were lucky to get a good table in the courtyard. With an extensive cocktail and martini list and kid’s menu, which I thought was a good combination – everybody was happy.

Service was friendly, food came quickly and although taste wise it was average, kid’s were happy and that is the most important aspect of going out with multiple families!

The beach was the closest reminder of home with soft white/yellow fine sand, and had familiar bushy green foliage surrounding it and similar outlook to the bay where I would  spend my summer holidays growing up on the south coast of NSW. The water was even warmer than any water we’d experienced in Vancouver.

I had to keep reminding myself that it was a lake not an ocean so each time I would enter, it was a little odd to taste fresh, clear water as opposed to saltwater which I expected.

As a final stop, we visited the Grand Bend Pinery Antique Flea market – 10163 Lakeshore Road, Grand Bend. It is open May through November and was full to the brim with stalls of food, poutine, bric-a-brac, new homewares, toys, antiques and more. Entertainment was very impressive too in the beer garden area. You need to allow at least a couple of hours as these markets are huge.

We had a restful beach holiday with relaxed fun company as you would expect. To finish I think the pictures speak for themselves and although it’s clearly not a hidden secret, I recommend this place to anyone visiting the glorious Lake Huron and seeking out a beach holiday in the Ontario province.

Interlude…

What’s on right now? I’m on holidays spending time in a cottage in Lake Bend, Ontario, friends in Toronto and a cabin in the mountains of BC.

Where I’m sitting…in the quiet of the forest in a cabin by a lake.

What I’m eating…french toast with natural smoked bacon, berries and maple syrup.

What I’m thinking…

I am thankful for the good things in my life right now and love my family very much.

I am sending courage and strength to one particular person today.

Canadians are generally very warm, gracious and friendly people.

I am appreciative of any comments and thoughts people have offered on my posts.

I wish I had more time to do more of things I love.

That sunsets can be spectacular all over the world.

What’s inspires me right now…the simple life in the mountains, the tranquility, beauty and peace.

What I’m reading at the moment…The 100-mile diet, a year of local eating by Alisa Smith & J.B. MacKinnon.

What I enjoyed yesterday…inviting close friends up to the cabin and cooking a local feast of wild salmon, organic chicken, quinoa salad, zucchini and lemon soup and baked potatoes for us all.

Roasted granola

Thank you to my favourite Australian magazine, delicious. as while reading the June issue I stumbled across the ‘Australian Flavours’ story on The Grounds in Alexandria, Sydney.

The Grounds is a recently opened industrial chic space set in a former pie factory which is a cafe providing house-roasted coffee, freshly baked bread and pastries and kitchen garden all in one. I miss brunch and coffee at places like this back home in Sydney, although I’m sure it won’t be going anywhere for a while.

I had to make the ‘roasted granola’ on page 88 from their recipe selection published which I adapted slightly with a more Canadian influence. I substituted sunflower oil for an organic virgin coconut oil to increase the flavour and health benefits. I prefer to use all organic products so the apricot was darker dried unsulphured apricots I also used half the amount of walnuts, no pepitas just sunflower seeds and more maple syrup and a little Fraser Valley blueberry honey. It was an easy transportable and sustaining breakfast we could enjoy at the cabin on Pender Island which was received well by all. This recipe will become one of my favourites.

Roasted Granola (makes about 15 serves).

Ingredients

1/2 cup (35g) shredded coconut

1/2 cup (125ml) virgin coconut oil

40g unsalted butter (I used Fraser Valley butter)

1/4 cup maple syrup

1 Tablespoon Fraser Valley blueberry honey

1 tsp ground cinnamon

500g rolled oats

1/2 cup sunflower seeds (recipe also calls for 1/2 cup of pepitas)

1 cup (160g) almonds

1/2 cup (100g) walnuts, halved

1/2 cup (85g) raisins

1/2 cup (110g) dried apricot, thinly sliced

Method

1. Preheat oven to 266 F / 130 C. Stir in coconut, oil, butter, syrup, honey and cinnamon in a small saucepan over low heat for a few minutes until combined.

2. Scatter oats, seeds and nuts on a baking tray and pour over syrup, stirring well to coat.

3. Roast for 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes. Add fruit and cook for a further 30 minutes or until crisp. Remove and cool. Store in an airtight container for up to 1 month.

Serving suggestion:- Taeberries and creamy yoghurt.  I discovered Taeberries at the local farmer’s markets on Pender Island, a blackberry-raspberry cross (similar to Loganberry). They are high in vitamin C and fibre and are a tangy sweet flavour.

Next, I will try to do Pender Island justice by writing about our weekend away at our friends’ cabin.

Enjoy!

Cherries, chocolate or wine/champagne anyone?

Since the start of June, I cannot help noticing all the popping red colour of cherries front of store everywhere I shop. Cherries always remind me of my childhood and our Aussie Summer Christmases. My Mother would fill a large bowl on display to brighten up the house and we couldn’t wait to take a handful!

Some of the things I love when celebrations start in Summer are cherries, chocolate and champagne – it’s the simple things in life right?

Although I know that while I am here in Vancouver, cherries are in season come Summertime but sadly without Christmas to enjoy. So when I saw that Whole Foods Market were selling these beautiful organic cherries at a special price this week, I couldn’t resist.

Our celebration was to have our first dinner party at our home here in Vancouver with our closest friends who have been amazing and awesome to us since the first day we arrived. We love entertaining and wanted to treat them to something special and came up with a vegetarian menu (catering to dietary requirements) which was delicious and not too heavy. I was also looking for a good reason to indulge in the local BC Salt Spring Island, Chèvres (which is a very soft, fresh goat’s cheese).

Our friends brought us an exceptional wine which I also want to make a mention of from the Okanagan Valley, BC; ‘Joie Farm’ Pinot Blanc 2011. Joie means “Joy” in French and this wine certainly lives up to its name and is inspired by Alsace with a beautiful tropical fruit intensity. This was a very memorable drop and I look forward to exploring the Okanagan vineyards very soon.

Our menu:-

Entrée – Sashimi grade salmon + Edamame                                                                     Main – Beetroot and goats cheese tart accompanied with a Fennel, radicchio and walnut salad (recipes sourced from delicious. magazine Australian edition). and the dessert…

Dessert – Chocolate meringues with amaretto cherries and coconut gelato (dairy-free)

The Kid’s menu was cheese and vegetable frittata with fries followed by banana gelato (sugar-free) with raspberries and a petite meringue on the side.

The sun has rolled on consecutively for over a week now and it is reminding me more of what our Summers are like back home in Australia.  I will combine a Christmas Summer favourite with the beautiful cherries that are in abundant supply which is just singing for an opportunity to entertain with these.

Cherry topped mini-chocolate meringues with coconut gelato (makes 6)              This meringue recipe is inspired and adapted from Valli Little’s recipe in delicious. magazine.

Ingredients 

4 eggwhites, at room temperature

11/4 cups caster sugar (or berry sugar)

1 tablespoon cocoa, sifted

1 teaspoon white vinegar

1 teaspoon cornflour

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

24 cherries pitted

2 Tablespoons of caster sugar (or berry sugar)

3/4 cup Amaretto liqueur

Coconut gelato (a good quality creamy one)

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 150 Celcius / 302 F. Line a large baking tray with baking paper.

2. Whisk eggwhites in the bowl of an electric mixer with a pinch of salt until soft peaks form. Add caster sugar, one tablespoon at a time, every minute or so whisking until thick and glossy. Fold in cocoa, vinegar, cornflour and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract until well combined.

3. Dollop 6 rounds of the mixture onto the lined tray. Using the back of a spoon make an indent in the top of each one. Place in the oven and immediately reduce the temperature to 120 C /250 F. Bake for 45 minutes then turn the oven off and leave the meringues in the oven to cool completely.

4. Meanwhile, add amaretto and sugar to pitted cherries and leave in fridge for an hour. Remove when ready to serve and heat up in small saucepan till syrupy consistency.

5. Using an ice-cream scoop place coconut gelato on meringues and pour amaretto cherries on top. Garnish with a few fresh cherries in the bowl as well.

A champagne to match for a celebratory note? Moët & Chandon’s Rosé Impérial – Enjoy!

A grouse salad recipe for the Grouse Grind!

Grouse, means by definition a mumble, mutter, complain pettily. However in our ‘Aussie slang’ it means awesome!

So given this evening my husband is about to step up to the challenge of the Grouse Grind, I thought I better make a grouse aka awesome salad for dinner which would not only be satisfying and full of flavour but high in protein too. I have included the recipe below.

The Grouse Grind is a 2.9-kilometre trail up the face of Grouse Mountain, commonly referred to as “Mother Nature’s Stairmaster” except you are on it for about 1.5-2 hours! (Sourced from www.grousemountain.com). It is located in the North Shore region of Vancouver, you stay right on the Capilano road over the Lion’s Gate Bridge from Downtown Vancouver.

The first hikers recorded on the mountain was in 1894 when a hunting party shot a blue grouse bird and named the mountain in the bird’s honour. It wasn’t until the 1920’s and early 30’s that it became a popular spot for adventurous hikers.  It is a steep climb with rugged terrain up an approximate 56 percent slope (30°) which starts at the Valley Station of Grouse Mountain and finishes at the Peak’s plateau.

This is a boy’s night out for my husband as he and a mate will be doing the evening hike after a day’s work, so I’m not sure what the motivation is; the excellent aerobic fitness workout or soaking up the view with a beer up top!

Atop the mountain, there are plenty of activities to do and I will talk about that next in my following post as I experienced it ‘without’ the stairmaster workout with my son, girlfriend and her children arriving by gondola which was one of the best days ever since arriving in Vancouver.

Ok, so here’s the salad I have made for dinner…it is not one of my own creations but I think this will do the trick to get my husband comfortably to the peak with loads of energy minus the sluggish feeling.

One of the food magazines I worked on in Australia called Good Taste published this fabulous recipe in the January issue, 2010 which is right in the middle of summer so it’s very suitable right now that we are starting to get the warmer temperatures here in Vancouver.

Quinoa salad with asparagus and feta (serves 4)

Ingredients

500ml (2 cups of water)

150g (1 cup) quinoa, rinsed, drained

Olive oil spray

2 bunches asparagus, woody ends trimmed, cut into 4cm lengths

1 large red capsicum, halved, seeded, coarsley chopped

75g (1/2 cup) crumbled reduced-fat feta

40g (1/4 cup) sunflower seed kernels

4 shallots, trimmed, thinly sliced (These may be referred to as white onions in North America and I have included an image below)

2 tablespoons chopped fresh continental parsley (flat leaf)

1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons honey (I used a Fraser Valley blueberry honey I picked up at the Kitsilano farmer’s markets, Vancouver)

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 teaspoon sweet paprika

100g baby rocket leaves (arugula)

Method

1. Combine water and quinoa in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer for 12-15 minutes or until the liquid is absorbed. Transfer to a large bowl. Set aside to cool.

2. Meanwhile, preheat a large chargrill on high. Spray lightly with olive oil. Cook the asparagus for 2-3 minutes or until tender and crisp. Add the asparagus, capsicum, feta, sunflower seed kernels, shallot and parsley to the quinoa.

3. Whisk the lemon juice, honey, oil and paprika in a small bowl until well combined. Add the dressing and rocket (arugula) to the quinoa mixture. Season with pepper and toss to combine.

There you have it, a ‘Grouse’ aka awesome highly nutritious protein packed dinner – Enjoy!

Please note: Image of shallots which could be termed white onions in Canada.

My hump day dish…Pasta e broccoli

So it has been a long week, or couple of weeks I should say. On the good side there has been birthday celebrations, Father’s Day and more cars free day festivals. On the not so good side there has been the physically exhausting exercise of moving house. Ok, although we were only moving up two floors in the same building, I soon realised you can accumulate quite a few items in three months!

So I apologise especially to family and friends for not keeping you in the loop with our adventures, but finding some focused minutes or hours in the day to write has been a challenge…anyway back on track now.

When even making dinner sometimes is perhaps one of the last things I want to do after all I’ve packed into a day, this meal is easy to prepare and my go to dish takes minutes to prepare.  Before you know it you are sitting down to a satisfying meal and a cold crisp glass of wine!

My hump day pasta dish (serves 4). This recipe has been a favourite of mine for years. It is particularly good I feel when I am craving comfort food. Surprisingly my son likes it as well, perhaps he is a salt fiend too. This is inspired by the rustic Roman dishes I enjoyed while travelling around Italy (on a shoestring budget) in my early 20s. Broccoli is the hero here for green goodness!

Ingredients

1 medium head of broccoli cut into small florets, (I like using the centre of stalks sliced too).

350 gm of spaghetti

2 cloves of garlic

6 anchovies

1 tablespoon of salted capers (drained if in vinegar)

1 small red chilli (de-seeded and chopped finely)

1/2 cup of roasted breadcrumbs (can make a day ahead – takes 3-5 minutes under grill).

2 Tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil

1 Tablespoon of balsamic vinegar, preferably a high quality aged one as it is less acidic and has a more caramelised flavour.

1.5 Tablespoon of premium extra virgin olive oil (cold pressed)

2 Tablespoons lemon juice

Handful of baby rocket leaves and/or parsley

Pecorino cheese and black pepper to taste – optional

Method

1. Place spaghetti into a large pot of boiling salted water on high heat. In the last four minutes throw in broccoli florets.

2. In a medium frypan, heat 2 tablespoons of EVOO (not cold pressed) and crushed garlic cloves on a medium heat. You do not want to brown the garlic, just heat for 1-2 minutes till fragrant. Add anchovies, capers and chilli for another minute or two.

3. Add balsamic vinegar, and you should see a slightly thicker caramelised consistency.

4. Mix in the breadcrumbs for another minute or so on heat and remove.

5. Drain your pasta, then in the same pot you boiled the pasta, use premium extra virgin olive oil to coat bottom and toss spaghetti, broccoli, breadcrumb mixture and lemon juice together.

6. Add rocket leaves or parsley for extra texture, pecorino and black pepper and serve.

Pour your glass of wine and enjoy!